Studio City - A Mile of Style: Whats History Whats Gossip


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I'd heard that Du-par's restaurant used to have cabins for rent. I confirmed the existence of the cabins in an old photo of the 76 gas station and car wash at the southeast corner of Laurel Canyon Ventura. Shirley Kaufman, whose family owned Du-par's until Tiny Naylor bought her out, said she too had heard the story about the cabins in the back of the restaurant, but didn't have any pictures to share. This stuff keeps me up at night. I thought I might dig something up with a genealogy search. I can hardly believe what I found out!

Raymond Blatherwick circa and his sister Mary were born to itinerant bookmakers who traveled in California and Texas.

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They became rodeo stars, who made their way to Studio City and worked in the movie industry as stunt doubles. I've met other stunt doubles from the Republic Pictures cowboy days who confirmed that stunt double work was done by hard riding skilled rodeo stars. I know - we like to think that our matinee idols were skillful horsemen - not always the case.

The Batherwicks traveled with the Ken Murray's Blackouts of a vaudeville show. I've been told that these blackout shows were inside the old broadway-style theaters on Sunset Boulevard during World War II. The theaters' storm lobbies were "dark", but the show went on inside. The Blatherwick clan is still going strong in Texas. They were almost as excited as I was when this story came together. These stories have a way of weaving themselves together over time, giving Studio City a rich and diverse history. Author StudioCityMileofStyle.

Nearby Places. Back to the Studio City Patch. The views expressed in this post are the author's own.

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Want to post on Patch? Register for a user account. Read more local news from Studio City. Find out what's happening in Studio City with free, real-time updates from Patch. Robinson did confirm that Presley was making more money singing rhythm and blues than black performers of the day. And as for the accusation that Presley was making buckets full of money off songs written by blacks, who earned very little for their songwriting talents, Robinson quoted Otis Blackwell , writer of two huge Presley hits ' Don't Be Cruel ' and ' All Shook Up '.

Without giving specific numbers, Blackwell confirmed, 'I got a good deal. I made money. I'm happy'. Elvis - 'I always liked that kind of music'. Robinson was impressed with Presley's honest evaluation of his contribution to the genre. Nobody can sing that kind of music like colored people.

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Let's face it; I can't sing it like Fats Domino can. I know that. But I always liked that kind of music. As for the 'shine rumor', it was easy for Robinson to discard the Sepia magazine allegation that Elvis made the remark in Boston, since the twenty-two-year-old singer had never been in that city. Robinson had also heard, by 'word of mouth', that Elvis made the infamous comment to Edward R.

Since records verified that Presley had never appeared on 'Person to Person', Robinson ultimately concluded that no proof existed that Elvis had ever made the alleged racial statement anywhere. Thus, JET magazine, highly respected among American blacks in , not only cleared Elvis of voicing the racist comment, but also portrayed him as a young white man who fostered race equality in both his professional and private life.

Elvis probably thought he had put the rumor to rest for good. Little did he know that all these years after his death it would continue to live on as an urban legend. The idea of Elvis racism would not die so easily. A dirt-poor outcast at segregated Humes High School, he wore pink shirts and pomaded hair like the folks he admired down on Beale Street. King, who later defended him in Sepia: 'What most people don't know is that this boy is serious about what he's doing.

Crudup, he said, used to 'bang his box the way I do now, and I said if I ever got to the place where I could feel all old Arthur felt, I'd be a music man like nobody ever saw'. It was statements like these that caused Elvis to be seen as something of a hero in the black community in those early years.

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In Memphis the two African-American newspapers , 'The Memphis World' and 'The Tri-State Defender', hailed him as a ' race man ' - not just for his music but also for his indifference to the usual social distinctions. This could be said to be purely circumstantial, of course, but the poses taken and comradely obvious in these snapshots do not seem to point to some sort of deep-seated racism on Presley's part. You will see in the photos though that the friendships where long lasting, with photos of Elvis with Sammy Davis Jr from the s to for example.

And possibly the best two examples lie directly below. Firstly, in June , 'The Memphis World' newspaper reported, 'the rock 'n' roll phenomenon cracked Memphis's segregation laws ' by attending the Memphis Fairgrounds amusement park 'during what is designated as ' colored night '. Although Elvis' recording contract did not permit him to perform at the fund-raiser for radio station WDIA, he set off a sensation.

All from just a brief emergence from behind the curtain!! The radio station called itself the 'Mother Station of the Negroes'. In the aftermath of the event, a number of Negro newspapers printed photographs of Elvis with both Rufus Thomas and B. King 'Thanks, man, for all the early lessons you gave me', were the words The Tri-State Defender reported he said to Mr.


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When he returned to the revue the following December December 6, , a stylish shot of him 'talking shop' with Little Junior Parker and Bobby ' Blue ' Bland appeared in Memphis's mainstream afternoon paper, 'The Press-Scimitar', accompanied by a short feature that made Elvis' feelings abundantly clear. Elvis Presley and B. Ellis Auditorium on December 7, Elvis attends with George Klein. Photos by Ernest Withers. Below , when Elvis returned to the revue the following December December 6, , a stylish shot of him 'talking shop' with Little Junior Parker and Bobby ' Blue ' Bland appeared in Memphis's mainstream afternoon paper, 'The Press-Scimitar', accompanied by a short feature that made Elvis' feelings abundantly clear.

Little Junior Parker was a successful and influential Memphis blues singer and musician. He recorded the song Mystery Train in , two years before Elvis made it one of his classic Sun singles. While Elvis rocketed to stardom, resentment grew among talented musicians whose similar-sounding records weren't getting the same play.

The hip swiveling that merely disgusted conservative whites amounted to theft for blacks. More than one player laid claim to Elvis' gimmicks. Blues shouter Wynonie 'Mr. Blues' Harris told Sepia: 'I originated that style 10 years ago. The current crop of shouters are rank impostors.

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They have no right to call themselves the kings of rock and roll. I am the king of rock and roll'. One of the favorite arguments of the anti-Elvis cadre is that one of his most memorable recordings, Hound Dog , was 'stolen' from Big Mama Thornton, an incredibly talented black blues singer who recorded her sultry, simmering version in Contrary to popular belief, Hound Dog was not some long-lost song of the back bayou, but a Lieber and Stoller composition.

For shame! I can't remember a time when covering a recording by another artist was considered 'stealing' -- this would mean that when Blind Willie McTell recorded Dying Crapshooter's Blues he was maliciously stealing the white Irving Mills's St.

James Infirmary. For that matter, both the American white Mills and the American black McTell 'stole' the song from the old British folk ballad The Unfortunate Rake , popular in the late s. This argument falls apart upon even a cursory investigation, and with it the entire 'Elvis stole the black man's sound' argument put forth by Mos Def, Chuck D. There is no 'stealing' in terms of folk music: the stew of racial, social, and most importantly aural traditions that constitutes American roots music cannot be reduced to simple black and white, moralistic terms.

Asked to characterize his singing style when he first presented himself for an audition at the Sun recording studio in Memphis, Elvis said that he sang all kinds of music - ' I don't sound like nobody '.


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This, as it turned out, was far more than the bravado of an year-old who had never sung in public before. It was in fact as succinct a definition as one might get of the democratic vision that fueled his music, a vision that denied distinctions of race, of class, of category, that embraced every kind of music equally, from the highest up to the lowest down.

In the same month of the Sepia article, singer Nat King Cole was infamously attacked onstage by five racists during a concert in Birmingham. The 3, white audience members booed the assailants, but did not intervene during the beating, which the men claimed was to protest 'bop and Negro music'. Well actually Elvis did, he started a revolution, it just took some time, and is still in progress. And there's a lot of resentment about that'. Elvis Presley But the singer's move to Hollywood struck many as an abandonment of his musical roots. Credibility with struggling black musicians faded when Elvis jumped to the big screen.

When he tried to become more middle class, he lost what people perceived were his black characteristics'. After Elvis' death in , white America's continued idolization of the singer didn't ride well with many black people who, particularly during the s, saw their contributions to pop music overlooked and underexposed. In , anti-Elvis sentiment exploded from black artists.

Studio City - A Mile of Style: Whats History Whats Gossip Studio City - A Mile of Style: Whats History Whats Gossip
Studio City - A Mile of Style: Whats History Whats Gossip Studio City - A Mile of Style: Whats History Whats Gossip
Studio City - A Mile of Style: Whats History Whats Gossip Studio City - A Mile of Style: Whats History Whats Gossip
Studio City - A Mile of Style: Whats History Whats Gossip Studio City - A Mile of Style: Whats History Whats Gossip
Studio City - A Mile of Style: Whats History Whats Gossip Studio City - A Mile of Style: Whats History Whats Gossip
Studio City - A Mile of Style: Whats History Whats Gossip Studio City - A Mile of Style: Whats History Whats Gossip

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